Worklog #2: Handling joystick input on Arduino and LinkIt ONE.

After expanding the LinkIt ONE and Arduino analog inputs, I had to find a proper way to handle user input. The easier and most convenient way was using an analog joystick, so I ordered one off AliExpress.

As I figured it will take way too much time to get here, I decided I’d open up my Xbox 360 controller and use its joysticks in the meanwhile.

 

Butchered 360 controller. Red = VCC, Violet = GND, Yellow = A0, Orange = A1.

Butchered 360 controller. Red = VCC, Violet = GND, Yellow = A0, Orange = A1.

Joysticks are made by joining two analog pots together (one for vertical movement, and one for horizontal) and a tactile button.

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A new board came in today: SeeedStudio’s LinkIt ONE!

A few days ago, Seeed Studio posted a contest in which 10 pieces of their newest board, the LinkIt ONE, would have been given away to makers who had a good idea on how to use them for an hobby project.

You can find more info about the board here, it’s basically a 32-bit MCU development board which has lots of connectivity options built-in (GPS, cellular, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Audio, SD card) and is compatibile with the Arduino IDE. It is based on the MT2502A microcontroller.

I immediately applied for the contest and a few days later they replied saying they liked my idea and they were kind enough to send me a LinkIt ONE.

I received the board today (fast shipping with FedEx!) and it’s very neat.

This is how the whole package looks like. The board is definitely well-made and feels solid.

 

Center: LinkIt ONE board. Left: Wi-Fi/BT, GSM and GPS antennas. Right: 1000mAh battery (included) and 2 Grove modules I needed (not included)

Center: LinkIt ONE board. Left: Wi-Fi/BT, GSM and GPS antennas. Right: 1000mAh battery (included) and 2 Grove modules I needed (not included). SD and SIM slots on the back.

 

The info sheet is included in the package: By quickly looking at it, the only complaint I have is the limited number of PWM outputs (2, might be solved with software PWM libraries) and analog inputs (3, can be increased using a demultiplexer) compared to Arduino.

However, the price (79$) is unbeatable considering all its connection options: separate Arduino shields would definitely have a much higher cost. Moreover, the MCU is a lot beefier than your average Atmega. Keep in mind that this board runs at 3.3V.

More info and photos after the jump!

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